Ulysses III for the iPad

Ulysses

The iPad is one of my most wonderful and favourite devices. I have no logical explanation for this except that, with a good keyboard, is the perfect device for reading and producing articles. The latter is primarily carried out on my Mac Pro but I suspect that there might be a bit of a dent in my workflow.

An extremely well designed version of Ulysses is being readied for the iPad and my initial impression is more than positive. I can easily see using this, in conjunction with the desktop app to free myself from the desktop and utilize a device that I use all the time for reading and other good things for my writing.

Nothing will ever replace my desktop computer as sort of the centre of my computing universe but there are times when it’s nice to have a change in scene. I could have done that with a portable computer and in fact tried that. However, that computer sat there, was very well looked after and was rarely used unlike my iPad.

I can’t explain my affinity to my iPad but it is definitely there. I love working on my iPad and spend a lot of time reading and collecting information that gets used in my production doucuments. With time, the iPad becomes ever more a functional powerhouse of productivity.

Ulysses III Itself

Although I stray every so often from Ulysses to that of another processor to give it a go that fleeting friendship never lasts. Ulysses III has all the right ingredients for me that make this the document manager for my web documents of choice.

In essence, the product is a database of documents rather than a collection of files that make up documents. Everything is stored centrally in the database making document management automatic and extremely easy. This is probably it’s most powerful asset form me.

Markdown Editor that is ahead of it’s Time

Not only is Ulysses this powerful database styled product which enables document management, it is one of the most powerful yet use friendly implementations of markdown. In a nutshell, it hides the markdown behind easy to use commands to create your document. If you want something “bolded” just tell Ulysses to Bold a piece of highlighted text. The Markdown symbols for bolding are added yet they are subtly hidden.

This goes for all aspects of the program. If you’re learning to write in Markdown, I probably would not suggest starting with Ulysses III. Rather, it is best to start with a markdown editor such as Byword, which is actually, in it’s own right, an exceptional Markdown editor. However, having leared Markdown, when you undertake writing in Mardown in Ulysses none of the hiding the commands do with your Markdown are a stranger. You’ll have full command over what you write.

Ulysses for the iPad

Previous to an actual Ulysses for the iPad you were directed to use Daedaleus Touch for writing on your iPad and then port it to the desktop. The key to this statemement is port it to the desktop. You aren’t working natively with Ulysses but a third party app which works very differently and personally I didn’t like it.

Ulysses for the iPad is Ulysses III. It works much like the desktop does but not quite. It uses somewhat of the organizational structure of the desktop. It’s not like Dadaeleus Touch however, if some still preferred the way that app works there’s nothing to stop you from using it. In my view there is little reason though to want to use Daedaleus Touch.

Ulysses for the iPad is Still in Development

Ulysses for the iPad is still in development. The Soulmen have done a fine job with the program so far. I never liked that you used an application so different from Ulysses III on the desktop. The iPad version isn’t a perfect replica but it holds similar capability to that of the desktop to make it a worthy complement. This similarity is the beginnings of functionality that will enhance the overall writing experience.

Flow is such an important aspect of the writing experience. That is, you need to be able to take your ideas and concepts and flow as you write. Concentration and the lack of distraction is essential. If the application that you’re writing in is so distractedly different from one application to another, then flow becomes very difficult. You spend too much time adjusting to the new environment and your sense of flow is impinged.

The iPad is a Wonderful Tool to both enable Information Gathering and Production

It is a commonly accepted fact that applications and their capability create the difference between success and failure for a platform. The lack of applications can create a significant problem. The second significant problem resides with the capabilities of applications to function effectively and produce valuable outputs. As such, intake and output produce value. As we do research we gather the inputs necessary to create outputs.

The addition of Ulysses III for the iPad is one tremendous step in adding greatly to this marvellous product line. There is a fondness for Ulysses. However, without an iPad version it was definitely limited. The addition of a product for the iPad is wonderful. Yet, it wouldn’t be if it was a poor product. It’s a good product.

You can easily leave your desktop and pickup your iPad and continue on exactly where you left off. Flow. Reduced distraction. Increased productivity. A great deal of value add.

Enabling the iPad

Ulyssese III for the iPad is an excellent addition to the product line. I will always be oriented to writing on my Mac Pro. However, it’s really nice to be able to pickup my iPad and continue with my work.

Further, it is certainly easy. The iPad is an incredibly light, convenient device to take with you to a mobile location. No longer are you stuck at the desktop. I use my iPad Air 2 in multiple locations. No longer do I have to compromise when I use the iPad to continue writing.

An Excellent Product

I am fully confident that the final iteration of Ulysses III for the iPad will be excellent. It can only add to the desire and requirements for a solid product line. I look forword to the final release of the iPad version as I both enjoy my use of the iPad and Ulysses.

Leave a Reply