Notes for Google a Powerful yet Intuitive Notes Program

Google’s Notes is basically the new kid on the block. However, it has a lot to like about it. It is fully cross platform and very easy to work with. There are Notes programs popping up everywhere but Notes (the category), in a way, is where it’s at. The idea of getting your ideas down sometimes as fast as they come to you can be very beneficial as you look over material and decide it needs working on.

There are Many Styles of Note Taking Programs

You might have one kind of notes program, such as an outliner like “Outline” or NoteSmartly but this doesn’t preclude the need to use a slightly more traditional note taker. As an example, you might tend to use Google’s Notes to grab quick ideas or information relevant to something you’re working but use Outliner or Microsoft Notes to Outline the structure of an article. In reality, a number of tools can come together to create that article, novella or Novel.

Evernote is the Big Name in Town

For Notetaking, Evernote has become the major platform by which everything is measured. I’m not sure why that is as one style of note-taker can have a certain strengths whereas another style has a completely different angle. Yet, both maybe needed.

Notes by Google resides in the menu bar. They generally consist of two side by rows of cards that expand out to allow you to jot down a variety of information, label the card so that you can group notes with a common theme together (takes the place of folders or subnotebooks and provide methods of apply tasks, colours etc.) and potentially come up with a new idea (which is the building of knowledge. Such knowledge is what allows us to reach our goals and progress forward.

Personally, of the general Notetakers, this is my favourite. It is fast but extremely intuitive. You can jot a bundle of notes to yourself around anything and label them so that they even form the makeup of a project. Memory wise they are efficient and the angle of tagging or labeling to group common notes together is fantastic. Search is fast and it’s almost so enjoyable to write your notes you write them just to write them. This shouldn’t preclude that you need to apply discipline so that you don’t have a jumble of uninformative cards of information.

An Evernote Replacement

I like Evernote. I don’t like the pricing structure. If Evernote didn’t have all the historical data it has, I wouldn’t have a problem giving up the program for Google Notes as I think it is that good. Getting your information from anywhere is more than handy but also the retrieval of something you want to read, research etc is superbe. I do foresee a day, in the not too distant future, where I’ll be retiring Evernote. I don’t like locked in a program and much prefer tranportable information regardless of where it lies.

Evernote may have made a big mistake with their new pricing model. It’s expensive and with so many going down this subscription paved road, when you start adding it all up the subscription based model can be very expensive.

Google Notes deals effectively with the Swamp without being in It

This program is a fast, clean and intuitive and provides all the power you need to store anything you’d like, make connections and track the progress you’re making on a project. Used in conjunction with your task management tools and any other tools you like using as part of a GTD exercise, it is a solid component as the storage or bucket area for your activities. Getting things done requires a good note taking repository or DB. Notes for Google is an exceptional tool to be used in this endeavour and will definitely enhance your overall productivity.

2 Comments

  • CD says:

    Do you mean Google Keep? I could not find Notes by Google. ? Is the above discussion about something for iPhone only? Not clear to me what this is about and if it exists, where is it?

    Thanks.

  • Kerry Dawson says:

    Sorry. You’re right. It’s called Notes for Google Keep and I was referring to it as Google notes. I wonder if I should re-title it if that’s confusing.

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